“Giraffe’s can’t dance”

“Giraffes can’t dance” by Giles Andreae and Guy Parker-Rees is a wonderful classic picture book with a great message!

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“Giraffes can’t dance” is about a giraffe called “Gerald” who’s legs are particularly bandy and thin, which means that he wasn’t great at running. Every year in Africa there was a jungle dance, Gerald felt sad because he didn’t feel he could dance like the other animals. When Gerald did pluck up the courage to have a go the other animals laugh at him and jeered “Giraffes can’t dance”, Gerald felt awful! He moves away from the crowd and finds a quiet spot, where a cricket speaks some wise words to him. Can giraffe’s actually dance?

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What a great story! It is great to share with children that message about that we are good at different things we have just got to find our thing. This book is a pleasure to read because of the rhythm and rhyme in the text. The pictures are bold and vibrant which enhance the story perfectly.
I always remember when my son was younger calling all giraffes “Gerald” because we read this book so much!

Here are some creative giraffe ideas:

Oil pastels/watercolours/sharpies pictures

Need: paper, oil pastels, watercolour paint, black pen (we used sharpies), scissors and glue/double sided tape.
To create the background the children drew stars using white/yellow oil pastels, then they covered the paper with blue and purple watercolour paint. While it was drying I invite the children to draw a giraffe with a black sharpie – adding brown/yellow/orange oil pastels marks for the giraffes pattern then they painted yellow watercolour paint over the top. Finally when all is dry I cut out the giraffe and stuck it onto the background.

Ruler giraffes

Need: Paper, pens, ruler.

The children drew their own giraffe then made lines with the ruler for the animals’ markings. The children finally enjoyed colouring them in.

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Happy reading and creating xx

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This entry was posted in Animal art, animal stories, art and literacy, Get crafty, Great reads, watercolours and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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